Wrap-Up

A March Wrap-Up

I officially haven’t been out of my house for over a month! Oh, what a lovely time this has been.


Life Update

What there is to say? Not much at all, and I hope it stays that way, because the only way I see Big Events happening right now would be if something turned worse. Still, since this is a space in which the only non-bookish things I focus on are nice things, I won’t talk about that and will instead tell you that March was an absolutely amazing month for the flowers on my balcony. My favorite picture I took was this one, because I’m really happy to see that I’m far from the only one who likes the muscari:

muscarbee

Armenian grape hyacinth (Muscari armeniacum) with bumblebee

Bumblebees are the cutest insects (fuzzy!), but regular bees come here too sometimes – though for some reason I don’t see them as often on my balcony – and I love seeing all of them around.


What I Read

This month, I read 13 books, which is… the most I’ve read in a month this year, I think. Of them:

  • 5 were novels (not counting the 2 I DNFed), of which 1 was a reread
  • 2 were novellas
  • 3 were nonfiction
  • 2 were poetry collections
  • 1 was a short story collection.

Reading-wise, this was a pretty good month, but: the five star curse continues. I still haven’t rated a new novel five stars this whole year. Short stories, novellas, nonfiction, novels I reread? Yes, several. That isn’t happening with novels, for some obscure reason. Also, this month I gave out an unusual number of three stars.

The beginning of March was off to a bad start; I managed to DNF two books before I finally finished something. These two books were ARCs from before I stopped requesting them, so I’m not that surprised – I know I would have weeded out one of them had I tried a chapter of it. ARCs of full novels just aren’t worth it when I can’t even get a taste of what kind of book they’re going to be beforehand.

  • My first DNF was Untamed Shore by Silvia Moreno-Garcia: this one put me to sleep. It took 35% of the book to even get through the things mentioned in the synopsis, and as with… pretty much all adult thrillers I tried so far, I hated every single character (well, not the main character, I just didn’t care about her). I don’t know why it seems to be such a core part of adult thrillers to portray all characters in a way that makes the reader wish they would die as soon as possible, because I don’t get it – why would I want to spend 400 pages following the problems of people I hate? I just don’t care. The writing was really good, and for someone who likes this genre, this is probably a very solid-if-slow book with an amazing atmosphere. I’m not that person, and the only thing I found interesting were the details about shark fishing (marine ecology & fisheries management brain was really interested in that, far more than anything in the story). [I also skimmed to the ending and, still, *yawn*].
  • My second DNF was Loveboat, Taipei by Abigail Hing Wen: this time the Try A Chapter test failed me. I liked the beginning; it felt like a fun-if-overwhelmingly-heterosexual story, and it was up until the author introduced a Chinese-Italian side character who was a walking Italian stereotype (emotionally unstable aka the dark side of the “Italians are so passionate” lie, handsy, an accent the others won’t stop mentioning: can we not) and I quit. I also think that I’m… just not going to get much out of this kind of YA contemporary anymore, and that’s one of the reasons I’m (a little reluctantly) moving towards adult contemporary fiction.

40539165._sy475_Then I finally finished (and liked!) a book, Queenie by Candice Carty-Williams. I reviewed it here, and I can say that it was an encouraging introduction to adult contemporary fiction, though so far the main thing that stands out to me about the adult contemporaries and litfict I’ve tried, compared to both YA and adult SFF, is the amount of uncomfortable/bad sex the main characters are having. So many examples of that are found also in Her Body and Other Parties by Carmen Maria Machado, the collection I’ve read this month (which I surprisingly didn’t love).

I then made my first attempt at a fantasy audiobook, with mixed results – not only because The Winter Duke by Claire Eliza Bartlett (review) was mostly an ok book, but also because I hadn’t understood how much not knowing how to write the name of everyone but the main character would have been a pain while writing the review. Luckily I found the names in other reviews, but before that, it mostly went like this:

the audiobook: EIRHAN and FARHOD
my brain: …Airhorn? Heron and Farrhad?

The Winter Duke took me half a month, but The Priory of the Orange Tree by Samantha Shannon took me even longer, and not only because of how long it was; mostly because it was utterly mediocre. It’s now been a few days since I finished it, and I keep coming back to how lazy the plotting was, especially by adult fantasy standards. It’s the kind of book I mostly enjoyed while reading, but that I never wanted to pick back up again – because when I wasn’t reading it, all the things I didn’t like about it came to me more vividly than what I actually liked (as in, it’s a relatively smooth-sailing adventure fantasy with not many surprises but a really nice setting and dragons). I was also reading a physical copy, which was physically uncomfortable. As with The Winter Duke, I had a lot of mixed feelings about it, I hope I’ll be able to post my review here soon.

Uncharacteristically for me, I also read a sequel I was anticipating! Stormsong by C.L. Polk, sequel to one of my favorite books, Witchmark. I really liked it, but not as much as the first book, and I wish it had spent more time developing the romance. Still, I’m really proud of myself for finally reading three new fantasy novels.

I also had another out-of-character moment when I went on a poetry-and-nonfiction reading spree due to the free scribd trial; you can read about those five books here in detail, but to sum up:

  • 41745412I started with Soft Science by Franny Choi, a poetry collection I’ve been wanting to read for a while because of how much I liked the cover, and it was really interesting but also really confusing; probably the kind of thing one should take more time with than I did
  • soft magic. by Upile Chisala was a heartwarming, sweet, straightforward poetry collection that was overall a complete miss for me;
  • I Hope We Choose Love: A Trans Girl’s Notes from the End of the World by Kai Cheng Thom was an amazing collection of essays about dysfunctional dynamics in queer communities that I think would be really useful to anyone active on queer book twitter;
  • Beyond Survival: Strategies and Stories from the Transformative Justice Movement, edited by Ejeris Dixon & Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha, is exactly what it claims to be, focusing on the how of a different kind of justice than the one we’re accustomed to, focused on healing instead of punishment, and I really liked it as well;
  • Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge, and the Teachings of Plants by Robin Walls Kimmerer is a book by a Potawatomi environmental biologist that should be required reading for everyone who wants to talk about ecology and human’s relationship with the environment, because the amount of people who don’t realize are spreading ecofascist rhetoric is concerning.

After that, I decided to read two novellas; reviews of both will be hopefully up soon:

Empress of Salt and Fortune by Nghi Vo. I was interested in it because it was described as “for fans of JY Neon Yang’s Tensorate” and also some comparisons with Mo Dao Zu Shi characters were made – and I have to say, while I didn’t really see the latter, it did remind me of The Ascent to Godhood and I would definitely recommend it to Tensorate fans; it’s now one of my new favorite novellas. Such a wonderful, quiet book for something about an upheaval of an empire.
The Order of the Pure Moon Reflected in Water by Zen Cho, which I didn’t feel as strongly about – maybe novellas just aren’t the right format for group casts, they almost never work for me (I remember River of Teeth failing for me for that reason) – but it was a fun adventure involving brigands and badass nuns. Zen Cho really nails it when it comes to humor.

32718027The last thing I finished in March was my audiobook reread of The City of Brass, which I started the day I discovered scribd was giving everyone a free trial for which they didn’t ask credit card information (…there was no way I’d ever reread this on ebook, too long, and the audiobook would have been 25€). I keep returning to how easily this wouldn’t have happened: I was ready to give up on the series. And then, I loved it even more the second time around – it helped that I remembered everything about setup and worldbuilding and very little about the plot twists, for some very lucky reason – and now I’m ready to finally continue the series.


How was your reading month?

6 thoughts on “A March Wrap-Up

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