Wrap-Up

July 2019 Highlights

Welcome to another post in my Monthly Highlights series, in which I will talk about everything book-related (and sometimes not) that happened in July.


What I Read

July was exam month for Acqua and heatwave month for Europe, so I’m surprised that I still managed to read 15 books:

  • 10 novels, of which 6 were ARCs
  • 2 novellas, of which 1 was an ARC
  • 2 collections, of which 1 was an ARC
  • 1 graphic novel, which was an ARC

I didn’t read as much as I read in June, but I did read just as many novels – this time, without DNFing one – so I consider this a good reading month. Rating-wise, there were a lot of four stars (eight of those 15 books were four stars), a few fives and threes, and a two. We’re over halfway through the year and I still haven’t rated a book one star!

As usual for a highlight post, I will only talk about the books I liked the most.

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↬ Ancestral Night by Elizabeth Bear is a space opera novel following Haimey Dz, a black lesbian space salvager, as she discovers an abandoned ship and the terrifying truths tied to its existence.

  • this is officially the most unexpected favorite of the year. I hated it at the beginning and wanted to DNF it, but as usual, sci-fi with somewhat dense worldbuilding is worth it
  • I had so much fun with this, even when the story got really dark, because this was just so interesting and beautiful. I was never bored, and this is longer than 500 pages.
  • the premise of this book is basically “archeology in space, but with pirates“, and if you thought it couldn’t get better than that, what if I told you that there’s lesbian villain kissing involving the evil pirate lady?
  • no romance, a great emphasis on friendships between queer characters, and does this book understand that everything, including space, is better with cats
  • combine the ideas of “ancient mysterious artifacts”, “alien technology incomprehensible to humans”, and “the terrifying beauty of space” and you get the aesthetic of this book
  • Haimey’s character arc is one of the best I’ve read in months. This is a story about coming to terms with trauma (she has PTSD from growing up in a cult) and while it gets dark at times, the ending was everything to me.

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↬ The Fox Tower and Other Tales by Yoon Ha Lee is a collection of cute flash fairytales and prose poems.

  • queer (f/f and m/m stories and some non-binary main characters) twists on familiar fairytale tropes and archetypes are so refreshing
  • cuddly foxes!
  • flash fiction is a lot like poetry, which means that sometimes this goes a little for the “pretty for the sake of it”, and… I love that. Because Yoon Ha Lee’s descriptions are many things but are never banal
  • I am still thinking about descriptions like “crystals unfed by unsunlight”. It shouldn’t make sense, in a literal way it does not make sense, but it does, it always does
  • then there are three prose poems, two of which – Candle and Thunder – are clearly tied to some characters from Ninefox Gambit and I still have so many feelings
  • “I don’t expect your hands to glove black (ashes are my favorite fashion)” I personally hate you, [spoilery name censored]
  • “and sometimes it’s about gunfire opening your heart” of course you’d use that imagery, go figure
  • it’s not really tied to the Machineries of Empire universe if you don’t want to scream “Jedao, NO” at some point
  • this, overall, made me so happy and there’s a lot of value in that.

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↬ Pet by Akwaeke Emezi is a futuristic novel following Jam, a black trans girl with selective mutism, in a world in which evil doesn’t exist anymore… or so she’s told.

  • I recommend this book to… almost everyone? It’s really short and it’s the kind of thing middle schoolers can read and understand but that adult can also get important things from
  • It’s unlike everything I’ve ever read. This is a YA book with no romance (already uncommon), following a 15-year-old main character (also not common) who is a disabled black trans girl (previously unheard of in tradpub YA novels) in a book that isn’t about her being marginalized. It’s also about a society that looks utopian to us (why are all futuristic novels dystopian?) and it involves paranormal elements.
  • it’s about how evil is allowed to thrive unseen when people start refusing to admit that it can exist, and it has a lot of really interesting things to say about what makes a monster, and what – specifically – makes monsters so dangerous
  • it’s a charming kind of weird, beautifully written, and unique
  • the main character isn’t always able to voice and as someone who has also struggled with voicing things (for slightly different reasons, but it’s not that different from the outside), the fact that no one ever makes her selective mutism a problem meant so much to me

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The Ascent to Godhood by JY Yang is the fourth and final book in the Tensorate series. It follows Lady Han, a courtesan-turned-revolutionary, and it’s written in the form of a drunken monologue.

  • I know “drunken monologue” doesn’t sound appealing at all but it works
  • this was a great month when it came to f/f villain kissing, because this is about the relationship between Lady Han and Hekate, the series’ villainess
  • how did I not know this was an f/f villain romance before reading it. how.
  • a tragic gay story, but not the kind of homophobia-related tragic gay story we’re used to; it’s a story about two very morally gray women and how their relationship fell apart
  • queer stories should get to be sad like the non-queer ones do, in ways that have nothing to do with the characters’ marginalizations
  • everyone is kind of horrible and I loved that
  • the best novella in the series, and I don’t say that lightly when this was already my favorite novella series. I love this world so much
  • …I still want more Tensorate

Life Update

  • Despite exams, I was finally able to have a free morning for my first Underwater Photography Day of the year. The quality of the water wasn’t the best – it wasn’t dirty (I know where and when to go to avoid that most of the time) but it was somewhat… cloudy? Not sure what the right word is in English, but I couldn’t see very far. Anyway, that was probably caused by a recent coastal storm.
  • Still managed to take some pictures, and the Cystoseira are still there, which should be a good thing (Cystoseira is a genus of algae known for being bioindicators of good water quality)


Cover Reveals

YA


Loveboat, Taipei by Abigail Hing Wen – I love this cover, it looks like such a cute, fun romance, one following East Asian-American characters and set outside the US!

When You Get the Chance by Tom Ryan & Robin Stevenson – this one is also set outside the US, it’s a Canadian YA novel about teens going on a road trip to get to Toronto Pride, and… there are so many queer YA novels, but surprisingly few of them feature Pride parades. I’m glad that this exists and that it looks really gay from the outside already.

The Winter Duke by Claire Eliza Bartlett – all I know about this one is that it’s f/f and will have a setting with a really wintry atmosphere. The cover looks a little too “generic YA fantasy for my taste” (it reminds me a lot of Bloodleaf, for example) but the details are everything.

Adult

The Unspoken Name by A.K. Larkwood – F/F fantasy!! I don’t love this cover, but I am really anticipating this book. I’m not sure what it is about Tor and F/F involving necromancy but I support the idea?

Dead Astronauts by Jeff VanderMeer – and I thought Borne was trippy. Oh well? (I love this, but it also almost hurts to look at)

Empire of Gold by S.A. Chakraborty – I still have to read the second book (I know, I know), but can we just say that the UK covers of this series are objectively superior? They have a simple, straightforward and effective aesthetic.


How was July for you? Have you read/are you anticipating any of these?

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8 thoughts on “July 2019 Highlights

  1. Ohhh I had the same experience as you with the beginning of Ancestral Night! (I almost wrote “Ancestral Bear” :P) Except I *did* DNF it. It didn’t really help that I was reading 3 other books at the same time, ’cause I feel like this is one of those books that deserve your whole attention. I’ll definitely give it another go when I’m in the right mood. I mean, the rest of it sounds absolutely incredible.

    Also, I wasn’t too sure what to expect from Pet, but I guess the answer to that is pure amazingness?? It sounds so different to other YA that’s out there. I can’t wait to try it!!

    And ahhh The Unspoken Name! I’m super excited for it! I’m reading a not-Tor book right now that also features queer necromancers, and I have no idea why that’s a trending thing right now but I’m not complaining. 😀

    Liked by 1 person

    1. …and now I want a short story about ancient alien bears in space.

      Yes, Ancestral Night is all but an easy read, especially at the beginning (the fact that I didn’t get that afthands were feet modified to live in low-gravity places until 30% wasn’t helping at all). I hope it works for you as well if you try again!
      And Pet was as amazing as it was short. I don’t know why it isn’t getting a lot of hype, it’s… so unique and beautiful.

      What is the other queer necromancer book? And same, not going to complain either. This is the best way to answer all the years in which so many queer bookish characters got buried. Resurrect your gays, with queer necromancy!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I have no idea why Pet’s not being talked about more, either. Maybe the cover’s too quirky for people?

        And Lord of Secrets by Breanna Teintze is the queer necromancy book! It’s maybe not as prominently gay as some of the other books, but it’s still there and I’m ALL for it.

        Like

  2. Ancestral Night sounds interesting…I’ve only ever read one Elizabeth Bear book before, and “read” is misleading because I DNF’d it (it was Range of Ghosts), so I haven’t tried any of her work since, but she’s such a big name in SFF I feel like I have to give her another shot. Would you say Ancestral Night is kind of…space horror?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I wouldn’t describe it as space horror. It gets dark at times because it’s a story about trauma, but it never gets… scary or really suspenseful or even the kind of horror The Stars Are Legion is, and what I meant with “the terrifying beauty of space” is that this book deals with events that happen on a scale that isn’t human in space and time – it makes you feel small, if that makes sense.

      Anyway, I hope it works for you more than Range of Ghosts did if you end up trying it! After loving Ancestral Night, I kind of wanted to try RoG, but the reviews make me think that I should try something else instead.

      Liked by 1 person

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